FIRE DEPARTMENT APPARATUS & PUMPING EQUIPMENT

 

1834- First hand engines (2)

1846-  Oct. 21st. First "Hunneman" hand engine the "Olentangy #1, at a cost of $675.00 with equipment which cost $303.50.

1846- Oct. 21st. Hose Reel and Hook and Ladder Wagon purchased for $147.58.

1856- Oct. 9th. A second "Hunneman" hand engine, a hose reel and hook and ladder were purchased for $1,184.88 and called "Washington Fire Co. #2."

1864- A second hand (used) engine bought from the City of Cleveland for $800. A company was organized and a station built for $3,294.76 and completed in 1868 to house this engine. The station was located on the East Side at the S.E. corner of Lake Street and E. Central Avenue.

1870- The first brass-plated rotary steam engine, a Silsby of the third size, and called "Delaware #1 " was purchased and placed in the Old Market House station at William and Sandusky Streets. This was the first horse-drawn piece of fire apparatus. (Until this time all apparatus was taken to the fire scene by manpower.) The first paid driver was hired

1874- First horsepower for hose reel. The second paid driver was hired

1874- Another brass-plated rotary engine of the second size, a Silsby, was purchased at a cost of $5,560. It was named the "W. E. Moore #2 Engine." The third paid driver was hired.

   

 

 

Steamers, hose cart and ladder wagon all horse drawn inside Fire Station in Old City Hall about 1890. From left to right Elmer Watson, Charles Grogan and Fire Chief Ed Balmer

 

   

1876-  First horsepower for hook and ladder wagon. All apparatus housed in one building (old Market House) with 17 men and the Chief. An appropriation of $3,500 annually; yearly salaries paid to two engineers (for steamers); and two drivers for hose and hook & ladder were full time positions. Volunteers called "Minute Men" were paid 50 cents per hour. This placed the first full time firemen in 1876 at four men.

1882- Old City Hall construction completed which housed the fire department that included 2 steam engines, a hook and ladder, a hose cart and four head of horses

1885- A Chemical Unit purchased to replace one of the steam engines.

1895- A new hose wagon purchased.

 

 

 Ladder wagon outside old City Hall Fire Station between 1898 and 1900. From left to right: Mike Hanley, Charles Kruck, Chief E. M. Heller , Frank Dennis and William Ruder , driver Oscar Jones.

 

 

   

 

 

 

Chemical unit in front of Gray Chapel, Ohio Wesleyan University campus, in 1898. Driver William Mathias.

 

 

 

 

 Ladder wagon at the corner of S. Sandusky and William Sts. in front of Old City Hall around 1898

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Horse-drawn ladder/chemical wagon at #2 Fire Station on the east side of Delaware (Potter St.) 1920. Fred Bills on the left and Clarence Reichelderfer on the right. Horses were Bob and Dick.

 

 

 

   

1913- The first motorized apparatus was purchased. Both were Kelly-Springfield built in Springfield, Ohio. One was a ladder truck and the other was a chemical and hose truck. They were delivered with hard rubber tires, which were later replaced with pneumatic tires in 1916. Cost was $8,000 each. The ladder truck was destroyed in an accident while one a fire run in 1937. First and second motorized apparatus. First fire run made July 1st, 1913.

1924- Two Mack 350 g. p.m. rotary gear pumpers with chain driven rear wheels were purchased. These were the first apparatus with pumps mounted and driven by the engine. One was sold in 1945 to an Enameling Plant in Clyde, Ohio. It was found much later in a barn by the Ballville Township F .D. (near Fremont, Ohio) and refurbished. Chief Bills traveled to Ballville in 1980 and photographed it. The other was given to the American Legion for a parade truck. Its location is unknown. These were the third and fourth motorized apparatus.

1936- The first motorized ladder truck was purchased with 200 ft. of wooden ground ladders mounted on a Dodge chassis with extended frame. It also had a vacuum booster pump and 110 gallon water tank. The ladders were held in place by vacuum controlled cylinders. The truck was built in Prospect, Ohio by the Hanley Fire Equipment Co. This was the fifth motorized apparatus. It remained in service until 1960 when the first Aerial Ladder was purchased.

 

  First and second motorized fire apparatus purchased in 1913. They were manufactured by the Kelley Springfield Co. of Springfield, Ohio and delivered in Apri11913. The first fire run was made July 1,1913. Ladder truck on the left -Pete Hart (delivery engineer), Frank Price and Chief Keiser. Chemical wagon on the right, Frank Amrine and Sam Jones. This picture taken in 1916 when both units were converted from hard rubber tires to pneumatic tires.

 

 

 

   

Third and fourth motorized fire apparatus purchased in 1924 from Mack Fire Apparatus of Allentown, Pa. Both were 350 g.p.m. rotary gear-driven pumpers. These were the first pumpers to be driven by the truck engine.

 

 

   

Fifth motorized tire apparatus purchased in 1936 from the Hanley Fire Equipment co. of Prospect, Ohio. The chassis was a Dodge with extended frame. It had a water tank and hydraulic booster pump 210' of ground ladders which were held in place by hydraulic cylinders. The occasion for this picture, taken 3-26-1942, was the purchase of new tire clothing. From left to right Captain Frank Price, Arthur Reese, Chief Fred Bills, Carl Zimmerman, Lester Zimmer, Jerry Pliickebaum and William Foley

 

   

   

Sixth motorized fire apparatus purchased in 1945 from the Mack Fire Apparatus Division at $9,500. It was a 750 g.p.m. pumper with booster pump and tank and 1,600' hose bed. From left to right Jerry Pliickebaum, Chief Fred Bills and Carl Zimmerman.

 

 

   

1945- A Mack 750 g.p.m. triple combination pumper was purchased for $9,500. It remained in service until 1990 when it was given to the Columbus Fire Department Fire Museum. This was the sixth motorized fire apparatus.

1951- A Mack 1,000 g.p.m. triple combination pumper was purchased at a cost of $17,000. This apparatus remains in service as reserve at this time (1991). This was the seventh motorized apparatus.

 

   

Seventh motorized tire apparatus purchased in 1951 from the Mack Fire Apparatus Divisions at a cost of $17 000. It was a 1,000 g.p.m. pumper with 500 gallon booster tank and 1,600 ft. hose bed. From left to right William Shaw, Chief Jerry Pliickebaum and Wilbur Bills.

 

 

  1960- A 75-foot Aerial Ladder (Seagrave) with a 1,000 g.p.m. pump was purchased for $47,500. (It remained in service until 1981 when the Aerial Platform truck was purchased.) It was sold to Fairlawn, Ohio (near Akron) where it was refurbished and is still in service (1991). This was the eighth piece of motorized apparatus.

 

Eighth motorized fire apparatus purchased in 1960 from Seagrave Fire Apparatus Co. It was a 75' aerial ladder track with a 1,000 g.p.m. pumper, 200 gallon booster tank, 210' of ground ladders and 1,600' hose bed. Cost of $47,500. From left to right City Manager Donald Mackley, Chief Wilbur Bills, Wayne Hilborn, Robert Tracht and Henry Wolf.

 

 

  1969- A 1,250 g.p.m. pumper (Mack) was purchased at a cost of $66,000. This was the ninth piece of motorized apparatus and is still in service (1991).

 

 

 

  Ninth motorized fire apparatus purchased in 1969 from the Mack fire apparatus division. It was a 1,250 g.p.m. pumper with a 750 gallon tank, and 1,600' hose bed. Its cost was $66,000.

 

 

 

1975- A Pierce 1,250 g.p.m. pumper with 1,000 gallon tank was purchased for $75,000 and is still in service (1991). This was the 10th piece of motorized apparatus and is still in service.

 

   

Tenth motorized fire apparatus purchased in 1975 from the Pierce Fire Apparatus Co. of Appleton, Wisconsin at a cost of $75,000. It was a 1,250 g.p.m. pumper with a 1,000-gallon tank, front suction pipe, and 1,600 hose bed.

 

 

 

  1981- An 85 foot Aerial Platform with a 1,250 g.p.m. pump and 210 foot of ground ladders was purchased from the Pierce Mfg. Co. at a cost of $240,000. This was the 11th piece of motorized apparatus and is still in service (1991).

 

 

Eleventh motorized fire apparatus purchased in 1981 from the Pierce Fire Apparatus Co. of Appleton, Wisconsin at a cost of $245,000. It was an 85' aerial platform tower with a 1,250 g.p.m. pumper, rear suction, 210' of ground ladders, and 200-gallon booster tank.

 

 

   

1991- A Pierce 1,000 g.p.m. pumper was purchased. This was the 12thpiece of motorized apparatus and is still in service (1991).

 

 

 Twelfth motorized fire apparatus purchased in 1983 from the Pierce Fire Apparatus Co. of Appleton, Wisconsin. It was a 1,000 g.p.m. pumper with 1,000-gallon booster tank and 1,600' hose bed.

 

 

  1989- An "Emergency One" 1 ,500 g.p.m. pumper was purchased at a cost of $200,000. This was the 13th piece of motorized apparatus. This was the first piece of equipment that did not follow the numerical numbering. All others were 1-12. This truck was numbered Engine 7. It is still in service (1991).

 

 

Thirteenth motorized fire apparatus purchased in 1989 from Emergency One Fire Apparatus Division at a cost of$200,000. It was a 1,500 g.p.m. pumper with booster tank and 1,600' hose bed.

 

 

1989- An "Emergency One" 1 ,500 g. p.m. pumper was purchased at a cost of $200,000. This was the 14th piece of motorized apparatus, though it was numbered Engine 8.

   

 

Fourteenth motorized fire apparatus purchased in 1989 from Emergency One Fire Apparatus Division at a cost of $200,000. It was a 1,500 g.p.m. pumper with booster tank and 1,600' hose bed.

 

 

Thus for the period 1913-1991, a total of 78 years, a total of 14 pieces of motorized fire apparatus, has served the City of Delaware. Before that from 1834 until 1913 there were four hand engines, two steamers, two hose reels, two hose wagons, two hook and ladders and two chemical wagons that were updated and refurbished from time-to-time that provided fire protection to early Delaware. There were numerous teams of horses used from 1870-1924.